Lot 154- 1935 Chrysler Airflow


154(42).JPG
154(43).JPG
154(44).JPG
154(45).JPG
154(46).JPG
154(1).JPG
154(2).JPG
154(3).JPG
154(4).JPG
154(5).JPG
154(6).JPG
154(7).JPG
154(8).JPG
154(9).JPG
154(10).JPG
154(11).JPG
154(12).JPG
154(13).JPG
154(14).JPG
154(15).JPG
154(16).JPG
154(17).JPG
154(18).JPG
154(19).JPG
154(20).JPG
154(21).JPG
154(22).JPG
154(23).JPG
154(24).JPG
154(25).JPG
154(26).JPG
154(27).JPG
154(28).JPG
154(29).JPG
154(30).JPG
154(31).JPG
154(32).JPG
154(33).JPG
154(34).JPG
154(35).JPG
154(36).JPG
154(37).JPG
154(38).JPG
154(39).JPG
154(40).JPG
154(41).JPG
154(42).JPG
154(43).JPG
154(44).JPG
154(45).JPG
154(46).JPG
154(1).JPG
154(2).JPG
154(3).JPG
154(4).JPG
154(5).JPG

Produced by Chrysler from 1934 to 1937, the Airflow was the first full-size American production car to use streamlining as a basis for building a sleeker automobile, one less susceptible to air resistance. This example features: Unit body and frame, 128 inch wheelbase, 8 cylinder L-head engine: 130 HP, Overdrive, “Floating ride with floating power”, The airflows were one of the first cars to be designed in a wind tunnel and 29,912 were manufactured from 1934 through 1937 (25,737 of the DeSoto version were built in 1934-36) They were truly “ahead of there time”. 2,398 of this series were produced in 1935. This car was restored by Don Seeley.