Lot 159- 1951 Nash Rambler Airflyte Convertible


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1951 Nash Rambler convertible custom

This 1951 Nash Rambler convertible custom is a rebuild that was completed in 2006. The original car was found as a dilapidated shell in a barn in Yakima, WA. The owner Mick O’Neill, a car enthusiast and lifetime tinkerer, rebuilt the car for his spouse Kaye, a fan of quirky-looking cars and the color chartreuse. Mick passed away only a few years after the car was completed.

The car was rebuilt from the ground up. The chassis and steel unibody were reshaped and refurbished. Much of the sheet metal is original, with some additional sheet metal coming from a separate 1950’s Nash Rambler Sedan. Minimal filler was used. Repurposed running gear, trim, and interior furnishings were added from donor cars including the sedan. The car is powered by a later model Ford engine backed by an automatic transmission.

The exterior is finished with a metallic yellow green. It features refurbished chrome trim and handleless door panels operated by a remote. The new convertible top is black fabric and rolls back into the trunk on refurbished rails. It is cable-driven and electrically operated. A matching top boot is also provided. The interior is finished with black leather and black and white houndstooth fabric. It features a 1950’s Nash Rambler dash and steering wheel.