1937 BUICK LIMOUSINE

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Power and performance were surely a large part of Buick’s revival. The new 320.2-cubic-inch Straight-Eight, which lived in everything but the most basic 40-series, was a significant step forward. It weighed about 150 pounds less than the outgoing Eights; it had larger valves (in the Buick OHV tradition, of course), yet valvetrain noise was decreased. A larger bore and shorter stroke meant that both engine height and piston travel were reduced. The new Anolite aluminum pistons, coated with an anodic treatment, replaced the cast-iron pistons previously used in Buick engines, providing a nearly 13-pound reduction of reciprocating mass, allowing sprightlier performance. The inclusion of an oil filter meant that oil life doubled. And the 120-horsepower rating was impressive for its time.